BOOKS:

 

Black Women in Sequence: Re-inking Comics, Graphic Novels, and Anime (Seattle & London: University of Washington Press, 2015).

 

Reviews of Black Women in Sequence:

  • Feminist Media Studies, (2018) 18:6, pp. 1136-1138.

  • Journal of Popular Culture, December (2017) Vol.50(6), pp.1440-1443

  • American Literature (2018) 90 (2): 439-448

  • Library Journal, Nov 15, 2016, Vol.141(19), p.70(4)

  • Little Village, (2016) Issue 192

  • Women Write About Comics, (2016)

Disciplining Women: Alpha Kappa Alpha, Black Counterpublics, and the Cultural Politics of Black Sororities (Albany: State University of New York Press, 2010).

 

Reviews of Disciplining Women:

 

Edited Publications (Books):

Ramzi Fawaz, Shelley Streeby, and Deborah Elizabeth Whaley eds., Keywords in Comics Studies (New York City: New York University Press, 2021).

Curatorial Work:

Deborah Elizabeth Whaley and Kembrew McLeod (co-curators), Two Turntables and a Microphone: Hip-Hop Contexts Featuring Harry Allen’s Part of the Permanent Record; Photos From the Previous Century, University of Iowa Museum of Art, March-June 2010.

 

Exhibition Catalogue Essays:

Deborah Elizabeth Whaley, "Celluloid Masks and Retractable Skins: Transforming the Scales of Blackness in Sequential Art" (Foreword) in 'Toonskin, exh. cat., cur. Kenya(Robinson), ArtSPACE, New Haven, Ct., Saturday, May 11, 2013-Saturday, June 29, 2013, pp. 1-2.

 

Book Chapters:

Deborah Elizabeth Whaley, "Fat Bats, Postpunks, and Ice Witches: Afrogoth and the Music of Militia Vox and Comix ot Calyn P. Rich," ed., Frederick Aldama., The Routledge Companion to Gender and Sexuality in Comics (New York and London: Routledge, 2020).

 

Deborah Elizabeth Whaley, "Neopassing and Dissociative Identities as Affective Strategies in Frankie and Alice," ed., Mollie Godfrey and Vershawn Ashanti Young., Neopassing: Performing Identity After Jim Crow (Urbana and Champagne: University of Illinois Press, 2018).

 

Deborah Elizabeth Whaley, “Graphic Blackness/Anime Noir: Aaron McGruder’s The Boondocks & the Adult Swim,” Beretta Smith Shomade, ed., Watching While Black: Centering the Television of Black Audiences (New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press, 2012), pp. 187-204.

 

Deborah Elizabeth Whaley, “Put Some Skirts on the Cards!: Black Women’s Visual Performances in the Art of Annie Lee,” From Bourgeois to Boojie: Black Middle Class Performances, Vershawn Ashanti Young & Bridget Harris Tsemo eds., (Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 2011), pp. 191-208.

 

Deborah Elizabeth Whaley, “Links, Legacies and Letters: A Cultural History of Black Greek-letter Organizations,” Brothers and Sisters: Diversity in College Fraternities and Sororities, Gregory Parks & Craig Torbenson eds. (Madison: Farleigh Dickinson University Press, 2009), pp. 46-82.

 

Deborah Elizabeth Whaley, “The Tragedy of Whiteness and Neo-Liberalism in Brad Kaaya’s O/Othello,” Daniel Bernardi ed., The Persistence of Whiteness: Race and Contemporary Hollywood Cinema (London: Routledge, 2008), pp. 233-252.

 

Deborah Elizabeth Whaley “Black Bodies/Yellow Masks: The Orientalist Aesthetic in Hip-hop and Black Visual Culture,” Afro-Asian Encounters, Heike Raphael-Hernandez and Shannon Steen eds. (New York: New York University Press, 2006), pp. 188-203.

 

Deborah Elizabeth Whaley, “The Empty Space of Sorority Representation: Spike Lee’s School Daze,” African American Sororities and Fraternities: The Legacy and the Vision, Tamara Brown [et al], (Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 2005), pp. 417-436

 

Deborah Elizabeth Whaley, “To Capture A Vision Fair: Margaret Walker and the Predicament of the African American Woman Intellectual,” (Epilogue) Maryemma Graham ed., Fields Watered with Blood: Critical Essays on Margaret Walker (Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2001), pp. 315-318.

 

Maryemma Graham and Deborah Elizabeth Whaley, “The Most Famous Person Nobody Knows,” (Introduction) Maryemma Graham ed., Fields Watered with Blood: Critical Essays on Margaret Walker (Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2001), pp. 1-10.

 

Edited Publications (Journals):

Deborah Elizabeth Whaley ed., Addressing the Crisis Volume 1 (2019)

 

Michael Hill, Jessica Welburn Paige, and Deborah Elizabeth Whaley, eds., Democratizing the Black Public Intellectual: Essays on Ta-Nehisi Coates (a special issue of CLA) (6):4 (Summer 2018), [https://www.clascholars.org/cla-journal/].

Deborah Elizabeth Whaley, Aimee Carrillo-Rowe, and Miriam Thaggert eds., Sexing the Colorlines: Black Sexualities, Popular Culture, and Cultural Production (a special issue of Poroi: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Rhetorical Analysis and Invention) (7):2 (Summer 2011), [http://ir.uiowa.edu/poroi/vol7/iss2/].

 

Articles (Journals):

Deborah Elizabeth Whaley, "Introduction," Addressing the Crisis, Volume 1 (2019), pp. 1-6. 

 

Deborah Elizabeth Whaley and Loren Glass, "Mugging, Mobbing, and Memory Screens," Addressing the Crisis: The Stuart Hall Project, Volume 1 (2019), pp. 1-11. 

 

Deborah Elizabeth Whaley, “Interrogating the ‘Look’ of the Gaze: Theorizing a Latina Cinesubjectivity,” Women: A Cultural Review, (23):3 (Fall 2012), pp. 323-345.

 

Deborah Elizabeth Whaley, “Introduction,” Poroi: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Rhetorical Analysis and Invention, (7):2 (Summer 2011), [http://ir.uiowa.edu/poroi/vol7/iss2/1/ ] 3 pages inclusive.

 

Deborah Elizabeth Whaley, “Spike Lee’s Phantasmagoric Fantasy and the Black Female Sexual Imaginary in She Hate Me,” Poroi: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Rhetorical Analysis and Invention, (7):2 (Summer 2011), [http://ir.uiowa.edu/poroi/vol7/iss2/6/] 37 pages inclusive.

 

Deborah Elizabeth Whaley, “Black Cat Got Your Tongue?: Catwoman and the Alchemy of Postracialism,” Journal of Graphic Novel and Comic Book Studies, (2):2 (June 2011) pp. 3-23.

 

Deborah Elizabeth Whaley, “Black Expressive Art, Resistant Cultural Politics, and the (Re)Performance of Patriotism,” Trotter Review, (17):1 (Autumn 2007), pp. 6-40.

 

Deborah Elizabeth Whaley, “We Strive and We Do: The Counterpublic Sphere Work of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority,” Contours: A Journal of Africa and the Diaspora, (3): 2 (Fall 2005), pp. 139-162.

 

Deborah Elizabeth Whaley, “With/Out Sanctuary: Teaching Race, Trauma, and Collective Memory through Photography in a Graduate Humanities Course,” Journal of Pedagogy, Pluralism, and Practice, Issue 10 (Fall 2005) [http://www.lesley.edu/journals/jppp/10/whaley.html] 17 pages inclusive.

 

Book Review Essays:

 

Deborah Elizabeth Whaley, “The Neo-Soul Vibe and the Post-Modern Aesthetic: Black Popular Music and Culture for the Soul Babies of History,” a review essay of Mark Anthony Neal’s What the Music Said: Black Popular Music and Public Culture (New York: Routledge, 1998) and Soul Babies: Black Popular Culture and the Post-Soul Aesthetic (New York: Routledge, 2002), American Studies (43): 2 (Spring 2002), pp. 75-81.

 

Deborah Elizabeth Whaley, “What is this ‘New’ in the New American Studies?” a review essay of George Lipsitz’s American Studies in a Moment of Danger (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2002) and John Carlos Rowe’s The New American Studies (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2002), 49th Parallel: A Journal of North American Studies, Issue 12 (Autumn 2003), [http://www.49thparallel.bham.ac.uk/back/issue12/whaley.htm].

 

Book Reviews:

 

Deborah Elizabeth Whaley, a review of Matthew W. Hughley and Gregory S. Parks eds., Black Greek-letter Organizations 2.0: New Directions in the Study of African American Fraternities and Sororities (Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 2011) Journal of African American Studies, (15): 4 (Summer 2011), pp. 718-721.

 

Deborah Elizabeth Whaley, a review of Jayna Brown, Babylon Women: Black Women Performers and the Shaping of the Modern (Durham: Duke University Press, 2008) American Studies, (50): 1/2 (Spring 2009), pp. 200-201.

 

Deborah Elizabeth Whaley, a review of Paula Massood, The Spike Lee Reader (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 2005) American Studies, (50): 1/2 (Spring 2009), pp. 252-255.

 

Deborah Elizabeth Whaley, a review of Daphne A. Brooks, Bodies in Dissent: Spectacular Performances of Race and Freedom, 1850-1910 (Durham: Duke University Press, 2006) American Studies, (48): 4 (Winter 2007), pp. 152-153.

 

Deborah Elizabeth Whaley, a review of Susan Courtney, Hollywood Fantasies of Miscegenation: Spectacular Narratives of Gender & Race (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2005) American Studies, (48): 4 (Winter 2007), pp. 167-168.

 

OP-EDS and Public Sphere Writing:

 

 

CREATIVE WORK:

 

Poetry:

"Whispers and Lies" and "Red Scorpion" (poems) in Kinitra Brooks et al., Sycorax's Daughters:, http://cedargrovebooks.com/sycoraxs-daughters/

Deborah Elizabeth Whaley, “A Poem for the Lynched,” Journal of Pedagogy, Pluralism, and Practice, Issue 10 (Fall 2005) [poetry: http://www.lesley.edu/journals/jppp/10/whaleypoem.html].

 

PUBLICATIONS (ARTWORK):

 

Art (Journals):

Deborah Elizabeth Whaley, “Illuminated,” 16x20 Watercolor on Canvas, Poroi: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Rhetorical Analysis and Invention, (7):2 (Summer 2011), [http://ir.uiowa.edu/poroi/vol7/] [cover art].

 

Deborah Elizabeth Whaley, “Faceless Fury,” 26x32 Watercolor on Cold-press, Journal of Pedagogy, Pluralism, and Practice, Issue 10 (Fall 2005) [http://www.lesley.edu/journals/jppp/10/whaley.html]. [issue art].

 

Installations:

Deborah Elizabeth Whaley, Pink, "Two Turntables and a Microphone: Hip-Hop Contexts Featuring Harry Allen’s Part of the Permanent Record; Photos From the Previous Century," University of Iowa Art Museum, March-June 2010. [digital slideshow of the graffiti, mural, and fine art of Lady Pink].

 

Murals:

Lady Pink, Anthony P. Carter, Deborah Elizabeth Whaley, and UI Studio Art Students, Mural done for "Two Turntables and a Microphone: Hip-Hop Contexts Featuring Harry Allen’s Part of the Permanent Record; Photos From the Previous Century," University of Iowa Art Museum, March-June 2010. [Now at the Figge Museum, Davenport, IA. 52801].

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